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  • Azhoul
  • Member Since May 5th, 2009

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3 things to remember when you encounter a new roleplayer {WoW}

Mar 25th 2012 6:41AM The unfortunate reality is that the majority of people who would benefit from this article the most, are far too self-absorbed to actually take its advice. Self-affirming hostile judgements, sweeping "do or die" laws, and mass ostracism all plague roleplaying realms en masse. Then you have the trolls and griefers slapped onto the list, and a majority of the remainder playing the role of xenophobic or apathetic strangers who keep to their own.

Furthermore, you have those with false smiles only playing nice to elevate themselves and gather an army of sycophants, which they then use to attack people. These individuals who establish a seemingly welcoming system, when the reality is that it's just a social power grab. When one disagrees with this false shepherd, they quickly transform from Dr. Jekyll into Mr. Hyde, getting their trusted friends to play the role of assailants as well.

This is the exact reason why so many of these roleplaying realms have fragmented and gone underground. Sure, no one likes negativity and many will protest against comments of a declining quality in roleplay community, but it's absolutely true. Both Moon Guard and Wyrmrest Accord have their fair share of extremely nasty skeletons in the closet, contrary to their popularity. People faking deaths or diseases and falsely accusing their peers of heinous deeds, as two relatively common examples of heavy drama.

I guess at the end of the day, I'm a little bit jaded. I've grown so tired of poisonous WoW elitism, e-hate and the blatant lack of support / moderation from Blizzard. I applaud efforts which parallel Anne's; any attempts to enlighten the general playerbase to being tactful and even perhaps nice individuals to each-other should be commended, but am ever cynical towards the notion of people who need to change ever doing so. It's why I've stepped away from the game, and why I question if I'll return again later down the road.

Mists of Pandaria: Yes, you get another character slot {WoW}

Mar 24th 2012 10:05PM I suppose you could use the reasoning of "At least they did something" but the simple fact is that they could not have done less. This is the lowest amount of development work they could've possibly done for this feature, which has already suffered from several years of neglect at this point. So while yes, Ghostcrawler's ideal scenario might have been out of their scope, they didn't really need to cut down to the bottom of the totem pole as an alternative.

Furthermore, arguments of "Blizzard didn't have to do anything" seem to only stem from the fact that they have little to no serious competition in the MMO market. They have every obligation to appease their customer base, and this isn't some sort of cosmetic issue or vocal minority complaint. I personally am disappointed. Not because I didn't get the ideal solution that Ghostcrawler suggested, but the fact that Blizzard did the absolute least amount of development possible on an important feature - yet again.

But I guess some things never really change.

Ol' Grumpy and the return of class-based quests {WoW}

Feb 3rd 2012 8:06AM Revynn:

I guess you could use that exact same logic with regards to the nerfs being made to raiding content and the like. "Just wait until it's severely outdated, and then it'll become marginally realistic to experience!"

Come on now. That's just not solid thinking at all.

5 Eastern Kingdoms haunts for roleplaying villains {WoW}

Jan 11th 2012 5:04PM Absolutely love the trend of RP spots. Very cool ideas for getting out of cities!

The Lawbringer: A primer on private servers {WoW}

Feb 1st 2011 1:57AM Wall of text incoming. If you don't like to read, skip to the last paragraph. Though if you wish to reply, please do me the courtesy of reading all that I have to say before typing out the fevered response. Thanks ahead of time.

First, there's a significant exaggeration regarding the statement about 60,000 members on a private server directly equating to 60,000 lost sales.
One needs to take into consideration the individuals who would do without if there was no alternative in private servers, as well as those who simply are unable to play on Blizzard's official servers, even if they wanted to. Perhaps these people are of low income, or were banned from the game.
The second number that people need to keep in mind is the people who both utilize private servers AND the official game. Obviously, these people aren't lost sales, as they're still paying the company the price they would be doing so anyway.
Thirdly are those who start playing the official game because of experiences with private servers prior. These people are best case scenario, and actually are generated purchases for the company.
When you factor in all three, that number takes a serious nose dive. While the situation is still bad, and the actions are immoral, they shouldn't be distorted to unnecessary extremes. That in itself is immoral. There's a difference between stealing a candy bar, and stealing a million dollars from a bank. This is a poor analogy, and I'll explain why soon, but first we need to examine some other areas before we can really get down to the truth of the matter.

Now comes the question about what you actually pay for when you're funding Blizzard. Many people are under the impression that the artists who created the game are the ones who are hit the hardest. In reality, most popular video game companies make thier initial production costs back in the first month of sales. The real cost is the customer service and maintenance of the game. Essentially, the corporation behind the artists.

When you pay your monthly fee to Blizzard to play World of Warcraft, you're not paying for the game. The game itself is paid for when you drop $40 on the box that it comes in. What the monthly fee pays for is the work of GMs, moderators, servers, bug fixes, updates, and all of those bells and whistles. The majority of these are not utilized on a private server, and thus, those loss margins take another nose dive.

After that is the definition of theft. This term is being used a lot, but very inaccurately in most circumstances. When you steal something, it moves from the possession of one person, to the other, without the transaction of an item of equal value; such as currency. With digital products, the original owner always retains possession of the item (including when it is sold), so where with a physical product it would be transferred, in regards to piracy, it is instead copied. This means that in all technicality, Blizzard isn't -losing- anything, they're just not -gaining- profits. Obviously, this is still bad, but it's another firm difference between what's being said here. The money that they already have doesn't go down because of pirates. It's just hindered from going up to certain extents.

Next comes the final destination. Companies that transfer digital products of creative work almost always make their initial investments back, and often make a solid profit margin for their efforts. The 'artists' never really get the raw end of the deal because of that fundamental law. It's the people who do the hard labor centered around the creative team's work who get dunked. Mainly because of other individuals who are willing to do the same thing for cheaper, or in most cases, free. The creative team usually gets thier cut of the deal, but it's the hard labor that gets cut out because of people willing to do what they do for cheaper. Personally, I call that a standard form of competition.

An analogy in my mind would be akin to a janitor complaining that they're losing work in a stadium because people start picking up their own trash instead of relying on someone else to do it (referencing to my point about what you actually pay for with your monthly subscription). Companies will complain about all of the money that they aren't getting, but at the same time expect people to not complain about the game they can't play. The simple fact is, some people will just assume that they're not getting their money's worth in certain areas, and will turn to alternative sources that aren't as optimal, but have a better cost to result ratio in their eyes.

In summary, the main point that I'm trying to make is that many companies like to cry wolf about how terrible pirates are for their products, and explain how the artists suffer. In reality, it's not about the theft of artistic work, but everything else that makes profit surrounding the artistic work; such as server use, moderators, updates, bug fixes, technical support, and additional labor features. The company then needs to adjust for the people who simply don't want to buy their product, all the while ensuring that the changes don't drive away too many customers and invoke a loss of profits. This is just a matter of profit margin per sale. And funny fact about that value, Blizzard already has it: $15 a month with $40 initial.

Cheers~

All the World's a Stage: 4 stories for starting an adventuring party {WoW}

Jan 28th 2011 1:01PM You know what I like to do? I like to watch the movie, then read the book. That way I actually can admire the movie as a fantastically well-made film, but understand that the book was significantly better.

It seems like a much better alternative than mindlessly insulting an extremely well crafted piece of artwork, just because of the comparative nature of people. Seriously, so it 'wasn't as good as the book'. Get over it. The movies were amazing, the book was unspeakably good.

Now stop insulting one of the best trilogies in film (next to the original Star Wars saga, of course) just because the art piece from a completely different medium that inspired it was better. Just stop. Please.

P.S. The "I suspect you would be one who never read the books." comment ignited this rage. I suspect you would be one who constantly acts like an arrogant narcissist just because you happen to be literate.

12 Days of Winter Veil Giveaway Day 12: WoW novel prize pack {WoW}

Jan 2nd 2011 7:03PM Oh please, pretty please! ^^
/roll