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WoW Moviewatch: Raid Eats {WoW}

Feb 17th 2010 2:00PM Has to be said, if you're a fan of the original Good Eats, this is HILARIOUS. Very well done! :-)

Leaving WoW until the Burning Crusade {WoW}

Nov 22nd 2006 10:58AM I think you guys are missing the point of her post. She's not saying "end-game raiding is broken, fix it." She's talking about the personal aspect of the game. Focus on this line:

"There is no character building, role play or ability to create a persona that is meaningful and adds value to other people in the game. I say it really lacks immersiveness."

See, I couldn't disagree more. I build my character in three ways:

1.) Experiencing new content. Have Naxx on farm? No? Then, keep playing.

2.) Gear progression. Have full Tier 3 and an Atiesh? No? Then, keep playing.

3.) The stature of my character, not only within my guild and raiding alliance, but on my server as a whole.

#3 is the really insightful one. No, you don't really find much traditional "RP" in WoW. I'll grant you that. But, I also think that the fellow who posted above that, "The lack of a RP element to your char means that your char is essentially... you!" was right on. So, what does that mean? Well, it means that the social aspect of WoW is basically a means of personal development, not just for some avatar, but for you as a person. Perhaps my experience as GM of one of the oldest and largest guilds on my server has something to do with this, but my first thought in reading those lines was "find a better guild." My guild has become a family. We share in each others' joys and disappointments, both in game and in real life. We talk on TeamSpeak whenever we're in game, and we have each other's Skype ID's (and often phone numbers) for those times which we're not. I've even met people IRL that I first met in game. There are people on my server who like me, some who love me, some who hate me. Yes, my avatar is my representation in game, and yes, it has become a part of who I am on some level. That's immersiveness. My point is that I really feel that whether you "create a persona that is meaningful and adds value to other people in the game" is really up to you and how much you let yourself open up to those other people and what they have to offer.

Cheers,

Thoros
Emperor of Guild BTMW
Gul'dan - Horde

Overrated responds to their permaban [Update] {WoW}

Nov 7th 2006 12:37AM Ultimately, the situation they describe (4++ hours of trash kills) is an inherent design flaw in raid instances. There should be various points at which, once reached, a guild could return to only do that part of the raid instance they desire. As for the "haxxzors" and how "horrible" they are, I will say this. I used to get onto people about buying gold and stuff like that, but I remember that back in the WC1, 2, and 3 days, Blizzard always put cheat codes into their games for people who just wanted to experience the content (for fun) without investing the time to bash their heads against each level until they beat it the old fashioned way. I was never one of those people, but I can understand how some people who are merely playing the game to get specific gear and then go use that gear to PvP or do whatever is *actually* "fun" for them may not want to continue to put in hours upon hours grinding away at trash mobs every night. I think people lose sight of 2 things:

1.) This game is supposed to be for FUN.

2.) Blizzard gets paid by making you play for longer. Therefore, annoying grinds and time sinks makes them $$$.

Number 2 is why we don't see any cheat codes or sanctioned gold selling built into the game. Blizzard doesn't want to lose revenue. At the same time, grinds aren't fun, so when your raid feels like a grind, I can see why people would try to make it less of a grind (less not fun).

That said, I believe that what we are seeing is the product of another flaw in game design, namely the 40-man raid. In order to fill a raid of 40 people on a regular basis, you need to have somewhere between 60 and 120 level 60's, depending on the dedication to raiding of your players. What's the result of needing such a massive number of 60's? You never really develop that sense of family fun and cohesive friendship that you can with a smaller guild that does smaller raids. People resort to joining big "raiding guilds," playing with people they don't know, and the result is clear: when you're not playing with people you consider to be your friends, the game ceases to be as fun. Yes, grinding sucks, but grinding with your best buddies can still be tons of fun because of the company. Fortunately, Blizzard seems to be on the right track with their change to 25-man raids in the expansion.

In sum, what this letter from Overrated makes clear is that while they take responsibility for their choice to use the cheats, they made that choice as a result of forces and pressures that were largely created by Blizzard's game design policies. Yes, we admit, we "cheated," but if the game was done right, we wouldn't have needed to do so. Just my 2ยข.

Breakfast Topic: How Do You Choose a Guild? {WoW}

Oct 30th 2006 2:20PM David,

You don't tell us whether you went Horde or Alliance, and that's something that always plays a role in my guild recommendations. ;-)

As for what I would do now, if I wasn't the GM of my own relatively large, successful guild on the Gul'dan server, I would download the CensusPlus Mod from http://www.warcraftrealms.com/censusplus.php , put it on auto-scan, and just let it run for a few days, collecting data. Then, you'll have a good idea of who the movers and shakers are on your server. Personally, I prefer 1-60 guilds who nonetheless do some end-game stuff, so I would look at the top 2-3 guilds who have people of all levels, a nice number of 60's, and contact their members, find out who the GM is. Once you've gotten the GM names, have a chat with the GM's. Ask them the questions that are important to you with regard to a guild in the long run, e.g., prospects for promotion, what the guild values, mission statement (if any), the way loot will be divided end-game. All of these things and more are the kinds of things that I would want to know before I joined a guild. Anyway, I realise that my method is a bit more scientific that most, but I think it should work well on a newer server.

Cheers,

RivanLord