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What's the difference between a 32- and 64-bit client? {WoW}

Jan 18th 2012 12:01PM yes, but the Limit in Windows 32 bit is still 2GB addressing for programs.

What's the difference between a 32- and 64-bit client? {WoW}

Jan 12th 2012 9:32AM The limits are Address issues. Think of a wall of post office boxes. 32 bit systems can only have 4,000,000,000 or 4 Billon boxes. 64 bit can have 10x18 boxes, or a very big number.

But there is a Window 32 limit in that Windows OS uses 1,500,000,000 of those address as reserved space, they may not have mail (data) in the box, it is just the box is unavailable for use because of future expansion needs of Windows. So, a 4GB 32bit Windows OS will not use more than 3 GB of physical memory, yes, if you have 4 GB there will be 1 GB of vacant, fallow memory (that might be used by a video card but that is another story.)

So, 32bit only has 3GB available to it, the Windows OS will eat 1.5 GB of 3GB system, which leaves less than 1.5 GB available in physical memory address space for WoW. Yes, WoW's memory image looks larger but memory contents are swapped to disc as needed by the OS.

Most new systems are 64 bit chips and CPUs. So, if you have a 4GB 64bit system windows will still eat 1.5GB of the address spaces, but you will have the ability to fill and use all 4GB of physical memory. The 64bit system allow remapping addresses needed to non-physical memory space.

Also a 64 bit CPU can use a larger, faster instruction set that can move twice the data per cpu cycle, that means you get a bigger shovel to dig your hole with along with the ability to dig a much deeper hole.

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