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Posts with tag ennui

Why do we WoW before WotLK

The Part Time Druid posted a bit of an existential question -- "Why do we WoW?" It was followed up over on the Altoholic. And while their musings on the motivations for gaming are notable, I'm happy they avoided questions around that horrible WoW-addiction issue. I'm not much of the navel-gazing type, so I wasn't concerned about why I play WoW, in and of itself. (Presumably, I get something out of it, so fair enough.)

But, with pre-expansion blues (and excitement) crashing down on our heads -- why are we playing right now? Our gear's about to go obsolete (and we're about to put on our green-quality clown-suits), our level cap's about to go up 10 levels, and the whole world as we know it is going to be radically different! Oh, yeah, and those guys are going to be around, stealing our tanking spots and doing Elune knows what else! (Anyone else notice they're the first class to have two words as part of their name?)

For me? Nothing special about the pre-expansion time period. I play the same reason I always do. I play with my girlfriend, I play with my friends. I play in the Arena. In a year, what I've done now might not matter to what I'm doing then. But what I'm doing now matters now -- and for now, I'm having fun.

Filed under: Analysis / Opinion, Odds and ends, Wrath of the Lich King

Poll: Are you looking forward to WoTLK more than you looked forward to Burning Crusade?

So recently, Tobold was saying that excitement around Wrath of the Lich King is visibly much less than the excitement that led up to the release of Burning Crusade. People are tired out by the 2 year wait, WoW isn't innovating, WoW isn't adding the content fast enough: there's just so many reasons that the Wrath of the Lich King is being greeted with ennui instead of excitement.

My first thought upon reading that: Wait, people aren't excited over WoTLK?

Read more →

Filed under: Polls, Analysis / Opinion, Blizzard, Expansions, The Burning Crusade, Lore, RP, NPCs, Wrath of the Lich King

The Perils of "WoW-nnui"

Terra Nova has an interesting piece up about what they call "WoW-nnui": After stepping away from WoW for a while, Mike came back to the game experiencing ennui. Don't worry, I had to look it up too-- ennui is "a feeling of utter weariness and discontent resulting from satiety or lack of interest." Coming back to WoW after a long break can give you exactly that feeling-- the thought that you've seen everything there is to see and do in this game and you're just plain done with it.

Is that possible? Of course it is. If Blizzard has failed to hold your attention (even after an extended break), then they don't deserve your fifteen bucks anymore, and it's time to quit. But ennui isn't always the end, as TN suggests-- lots of players have gone through it, even after a respec, or (to a lesser extent) after a particularly comprehensive revamp. And for me personally, even if I'm faced with a little boredom after a long break, even a short bit of grinding usually gets me right back in the thick of things, looking for loot and XP.

Now, as TN notes, anybody experiencing "WoW-nnui" at this point will probably be back for the expansion anyway, and there's a whole slew of games waiting in the wings to grab anybody walking away from WoW. Obviously, Blizzard has an impetus (see? I can do it too, Terra Nova) to keep ennui out of the game, or at least in control. Is it out of control? When you come back after a long break, are you back in the game, or thinking about getting out of it?

Filed under: Analysis / Opinion, Tips, Virtual selves

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